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Thanks to these donors who contributed to our IndieGoGo Diversity Scholarship campaign:

Abby Paloma, Akasha Skaldeman, Alexandra Bwye, Alison Huse Farhner, Arlo Raven, Beverly Naidus, Carole A. McCabe, Chris Sherbak, Claire Chuck Bohman, Cynthia Savage, Dominique Adrian, Doris and Joel Diamond, Elaine Cason, Elizabeth Morgan Tyler, Emily Kihn, Jamie L Heckert, Jim Haber, Joan Cook, JoAnn Schwartz, Johanna Rau, Joyce Kitcho, Juergen Piater Karen March, Kelley Keefner, Lauren Liebling Davis, Laurie White, Lorna Thomas, Mary Hoogeeen, Myshele Goldberg, Nancy Johnson Nancy K. Cadigan, Nanlouise Wolfe & Stephen Zunes, Pam Hamblin, Parker Flowers, Rachel Renee Young, Rob Fader, Rosa Zubizarreta, Rosemary Zappulla, San Mueller, Shelley Marlow, Silvia Daole, Silvia Di Blasio, Siri Kalla, Sophia Bonnie Wodin, Tara Treanor, Vladislav Davidzon, Will Gowen, Yvonne Devine

 

help train the earth healers

Permaculture, activism, spirit: the tools to reshape our world. Help Earth Activist Training put them into the hands of those who most need them!

What would you do to change the world if you could do anything, or everything? Would you grow food in the inner city to feed the bodies and souls of kids who grow up in an atmosphere of poverty and violence? Or work with Palestinian and Israeli women to develop new economic alternatives for self-reliance? Or study the potential for sequestering carbon in healthy, organic soil? Or build permaculture infrastructure for a climate change mobilization? Or retrain traumatized veterans for jobs in regenerative fields?

EAT students taking notes during a design session

Would you inspire people by peddling a bamboo bike across North America, like our EAT graduate Rob Greenfield? He did it using only off-the-grid power, producing virtually no trash, and eating only healthy, sustainably-produced food.

Or would you inspire your friends and neighbors at home to organize your own community to become more resilient and sustainable, like Patty Love who directs the Rochester Permaculture Center and and works with food justice issues through Lots of Food?

EAT students working with cob

We can't do it all, as individuals. But together we can be part of the network of inspired, motivated folks who, shoulder to shoulder, can change the world.

Our EAT graduates are doing all of the above, and so much more! And we have new people asking for our support every day, people like:

Amini, who runs gardening and permaculture programs in inner-city Queens, and dreams of making her urban neighborhood as beautiful as her native Caribbean.

Venecia, who is building a medical clinic in India to serve low-income women.

People like Frédéric and Koby, who co-conceived the Living Archives of Montreal and now want to continue exploring possibilities for sustained movement building.

And many, many more. We need your help to provide them with the training and support that can make them even more effective.


In the last thirteen years, EAT has trained thousands of activists in the skills and tools that can help build the future we want to see.

EAT students working on a roof

But activists often lack money. Up to one-half or more of our students in a typical course receive some sort of work trade or financial aid. We need your help to keep the work sustainable and accessible. Our activist scholarships provide a chance for organizers and front-line activists to learn new tools, skills and insights, and renew their own hope and optimism.


 

 

Earth Activist Training has a commitment to broaden and diversify the environmental movement. The key to doing it is so ridiculously simple: money! When we have funding to offer Diversity Scholarships to people of color working on environmental and food justice issues, the scholarships are snapped up as fast as we can put them out. Those students go on to become leaders and models in their own communities. They’re people like Brandi who inspires young women from San Francisco’s public housing projects to grow and eat healthy food — and grow confidence and self-esteem in the process.

EAT student smiling
EAT students

Will you help us provide the resources to those who most need them?


EAT has a commitment to share our skills and resources with the communities most impacted by poverty and environmental degradation. We have a longstanding relationship with Hunters Point Family, a community-based organization in San Francisco's most stressed inner-city neighborhood. We support their three community gardens, their Girls2000 program that builds self-esteem and self-reliance for middle-school-aged girls from public housing, their job training programs for at-risk youth and young adults with a criminal justice history.

EAT students in a San Francisco inner city session

Will you help us interrupt the prison pipeline that dooms so many youth and divert their amazing energy and creativity toward a positive future?

We're so deeply grateful for the support we've received. You make the work of transformation possible! Thank you for your encouragement and generosity!

EAT students during an urban session

 

Donate online:

To give to the EAT scholarship fund through Network for Good (below), please choose "Earth Activist Training" in the Program Designation box.


Donate by mail:

Your check should be made out to Alliance for Community Trainers and earmarked EAT. (Don't forget that part, please!)

Mail to:
ACT
PO Box 1286
Austin TX 78767-1286

We ask your help to make Earth Activist Training available to all.

contact

For questions or additional information, contact us at EarthActivistTraining(at)gmail.com.
 
student student activist student talking



Earth Activist Training
Original logo artwork by Beatriz Mendoza. Website by Terrapin.
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